Clinton, Trump suffer from high unpopularity among likely voters: poll

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign stop at the Quad City Federation of Labor's Salute to Labor Chicken Fry in Hampton, Illinois September 7, 2015. REUTERS/Brian C. FrankMore than half of the likely voters, or 53 percent, said they had “strongly unfavorable” views of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, while 46 percent said the same about his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, according to a national poll released Thursday.

Clinton now holds 10-point lead over Trump, 51 percent to 41 percent, among likely voters in a two-way race, the Quinnipiac University poll finds.

The New York billionaire leads Clinton among white men, 59 percent to 32 percent, and voters who are 50 years of age and older, while Clinton has the support of women, 60 percent to 36 percent, and those younger than 50, the poll shows, noting Trump has only 29 percent support of millennials aged from 18 to 34, and 15 percent of nonwhites.

Unpopularity rate remains high for both the two main parties’ candidates though the latest results are a little bit better than what was issued earlier this month.

The former Secretary of State is viewed negatively by 59 percent of voters and Trump by 64 percent, according to the NBC News and the Survey Monkey Weekly Election Tracking Poll issued on Aug. 16.

Trump has recently soften his harshest positions on illegal immigrants and even apologized for causing pain to those he had attacked. However, it is deeply suspected if the change can continue and improve his performance in the polls.

Meanwhile, criticism has mounted for days over the allegations that donors to the Clinton Foundation enjoyed an easy access to Clinton during her time in the State Department.

The position change of Trump seems to be too convenient while the allegations over the Clinton Foundation have dealt a new blow to the Democratic nominee, leaving small room for them to swiftly enhance their popularities among voters, local analysts say.

 

Source: Xinhua