Farming in Ghana

Start Your Mango Farm II

Pests and Diseases They include mealy bugs, bugs, fruit flies, mango stone weevil, thrips, mites and paddle-legged bugs. Control: By practicing strict farm hygiene. For fruit flies and mealy bugs use bio-agents and/or pheromone traps. Manage mango seed weevil by spraying recommended insecticides when fruit reaches pigeon egg size (10mm). A 2nd or 3rd spray at 10-12 days interval may be necessary ...

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What you have to know about Farmers’ Day

“Farmers’ Day” was instituted by the Government in 1985 in recognition of the vital role farmers and fishers play in the economy especially the highly commendable output of farmers and fishermen in 1984, (about 30% growth), after the bad agricultural years of 1982 and 1983. The day is celebrated to motivate them to produce more. The first National Farmers’ Day ...

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Start Your Mango Farm I

Mangoes are juicy stone fruit (drupe) from numerous species of tropical trees belonging to the flowering plant genus Mangifera, cultivated mostly for their edible fruit. Mango trees grow to 35–40 m (115–131 ft) tall, with a crown radius of 10 m (33 ft). The trees are long-lived, as some specimens still fruit after 300 years. In deep soil, the taproot descends to a depth of 6 m (20 ft), with profuse, wide-spreading feeder roots; the tree ...

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Start Your Pawpaw Farm II

Pawpaw Management Let’s now go through some various and easy managements to help your pawpaw farm. Routine weed control is recommended. Hand weeding where practiced should be shallow to avoid damaging roots. It should be done gently and slowly. As much as possible. It’s okay if the leaves wilt a little bit in hot weather. Pawpaws love heat and sunlight. You ...

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Start Your Pawpaw Farm I

Paw paw fruit Farming in Ghana is done in tropical and subtropical climates and pawpaw plants do not tolerate freezing temperatures. Papayas fruits are delicious and grow throughout the year. These fruits are eaten alone or in salad without the skin. The papaws fruits are low in calories and high in potassium, vitamin A and C. Papayas enzymes promote digestion ...

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Starting Rabbit Farm II

Feeding Rabbits are herbivores that feed by grazing on grass, forbs, and leafy weeds. Consequently, their diet contains large amounts of cellulose, which is hard to digest. Rabbits solve this problem via a form of hindgut fermentation. They pass two distinct types of feces: hard droppings and soft black viscous pellets, the latter of which are known as caecotrophs and are immediately eaten (a behaviour known as coprophagy). Rabbits ...

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Start Your Pear Farm II

Avocado Trees are very popular fruits in Ghana and many African countries. It is also popularly known for its healthy and delicious avocado fruits. avocado tree is easy to grow and self-pollinating. Avocados have a very high nutritive level. It’s the only fruit that has mono-unsaturated fat. This is reported to increase good cholesterol (HDL) and also decrease bad cholesterol  ...

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Start Your Pear Farm I

The pear is native to coastal and mildly temperate regions of the Old World, from western Europe and north Africa east right across Asia. It is a medium-sized tree, reaching 10–17 metres (33–56 ft) tall, often with a tall, narrow crown; a few species are shrubby. Pear is an excellent source of vitamin C and fibre and other beneficial nutrients. Pear can be consumed as ...

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Start Your Pepper Farm II

Some Common Diseases of Peppers The descriptions below will help you identify diseases affecting your crops. By following the recommended controls you may be able to notice the problem early on and check their progress. Leaf spot shows up in various forms: leaves, stems, or roots develop small, yellowish-green to brown spots; old leaves may show water-soaked spots; fruit develop small, ...

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Start Your Pepper Farm I

Peppers make the garden brighter. The glistening greens of the leaves and the rainbow of colors of the ripening peppers – red, yellow, orange, green, brown or purple – all mark the rows where peppers are growing. They’re so striking, you’ll probably want to plant peppers in a spot where they can easily be seen and appreciated by visitors. Varieties There ...

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