7 Things You Need To Do The Moment You Lose Your Job

goodIf you’ve ever lost your job you can probably relate to the initial shock and disbelief that’s often followed closely by such feelings as confusion and anger.

When you lose your job, particularly if it was unexpected, it can be confusing to know exactly what to do next. These tips will set you up to get back into the workforce as soon as possible.

Line up your references

Obviously if you’ve just lost your job you’re probably going to need to find a new one pretty quickly. Consider things you’ll need to make your job hunt easier.

One of the biggest contributing factors to landing your next job will be your ability to supply a suite of verbal professional references. You’ll likely need three, so start deciding who these may be.

If your employer fired you for something like poor performance, you may need to get a little bit creative with whom you ask to vouch for the quality of your work.

Certainly your immediate manager may not be the best person to ask. Perhaps there was another colleague who may have been impressed with your work and is willing to act as a professional reference.

Notify the masses

The importance of networking can’t be stressed enough and therefore it’s critical to keep the people in your network informed of your movement.

Send a group email from a professional email address. That is, one that contains your first and last name and not the name of any pets or fantasy characters leftover from younger years.

If you don’t have a suitable personal email address, now is the time to set one up, because soon enough you’ll be needing it to send out a bunch of job applications.

A Gmail or Hotmail address is acceptable, or if you have registered your own domain name with your own personal name then that will look exceptionally professional to send an email from.

Use this email address to notify those in your network that you’re now contactable here instead. Your previous employer will likely redirect incoming email to your former work email address and the last thing you’ll want is for them to receive personal emails from your mum, partner or old boss.

Refurbish your resume

Your cover letter and resume are your most significant marketing tools, so update them as a priority. The sooner these documents are up to scratch, the sooner you can start applying for new positions.

You may feel confident enough to update them yourself, however, it’s a wise idea to consider engaging the services of an experienced professional. Some companies are starting to offer outplacement services which can help you not only updating our resume but also interview support for your transition.

Competition is high in the current economic climate so there’s every reason to ensure you market yourself in the best possible way.

Professional networking platforms

Focus also on refreshing your LinkedIn and other professional networking profiles ready for the favorable consumption of hiring managers.

A joke that may have been funny in the past may no longer be appropriate, similarly an incomplete profile will not reflect favorably upon yourself.

If you opt to have your resume and cover letter professionally written, also consider having your online profile written by a professional with expertise in this area too.

Interim work

Depending on your financial situation, you may wish to seek interim work in order to keep some money coming in whilst you spend time searching for a more permanent solution.

Consider finding part-time work to keep you busy as well as earning cash in the short term and use your spare time to continue your job search.

Financial snapshot

The urgency with which you carry out your job search will likely be determined by your financial situation. Consider the amount of cash you have in savings and current accounts, and consider how long this will last.

Take into account the amount of people you support as well as how much your essential expenses cost on a weekly or monthly basis. Use a monthly expense calculator and once you’ve gained a solid understanding of your current financial position, you can then find work that will provide a short or longer term solution to your financial needs.

Reconnect with yourself

This flurry of professional activity may result in overlooking the need to nourish your soul. Take time out to reflect upon what you’ve learned by this experience and also give yourself kudos for the things you accomplished during the time spent in your most recent role.

Consider the new skills you may have learned and new valuable relationships you may have built. The job may not have worked out for one reason or another, but there will still be many positive things you can take away from the experience that will help you flourish in your next role

 

Source: LifeHack